smithsonianlibraries:

July 31st is the birthday of artist and naturalist Mary Vaux Walcott. Born in 1860, Walcott took an early interest in the arts. After spending many of her summers in the wilds of Western Canada with her family, she turned her artistic inclinations towards botanical illustration. Later in life, she married Charles Doolittle Walcott, who was Secretary of the Smithsonian at the time (1914).

She returned to the Rockies for many months out of the year with Charles as he conducted paleontological and geological studies. There she continued her watercolor studies of native flowers. The Smithsonian published her illustrations in North American Wild Flowers in 1925 in a five volume set that you can find in the Biodiversity Heritage Library.  

We’ve posted about Walcott before, here and here. Her work is exceptionally beautiful, and we think some of the blooms here might have even been in bloom around her birthday.

(vía heaveninawildflower)

houndeye:

Tyler D. Graffam
tylerdgraffam:

Portrait of Ben oil on canvas, 8x10” Part of my upcoming exhibition Identity Online at Rats 9 Gallery in Montreal.An excerpt from Ben’s bio: “Before the internet, i did not even know there was a word such as genderfluid. i had no idea that there were others like me who felt like a man one day and a female the next. i did not of words like zie or hir or cisgender. there was so much that i did not know and so much that i could learn and it could all be found in one place.”

houndeye:

Tyler D. Graffam

tylerdgraffam:

Portrait of Ben 
oil on canvas, 8x10” 
Part of my upcoming exhibition Identity Online at Rats 9 Gallery in Montreal.

An excerpt from Ben’s bio: “B
efore the internet, i did not even know there was a word such as genderfluid. i had no idea that there were others like me who felt like a man one day and a female the next. i did not of words like zie or hir or cisgender. there was so much that i did not know and so much that i could learn and it could all be found in one place.”

(vía mauriboy)